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llGrants are of two general types:  internal grants (i.e. from Duke) and external grants (from foundations or federal agencies, like the NIH).  Fellowships typically provide tuition and stipend support, while research grants support the costs of conducting the research.

All grants are extremely competitive!  Click here for some fellowship-writing advice provided by Meredith Spence Beaulieu.  

Internal:

Deans Fellowship

The Dean’s Graduate Fellowships are provided to students who—by reason of their background, culture, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, work, and life experiences—contribute to a fuller representation of perspectives within the academic life of the University. The Graduate School’s commitment to promoting and benefiting from diversity leads it to encourage nominations of students who are black/African American, American Indian/Alaskan native, and Hispanic/Latino Americans. All nominees must be US citizens.

The Dean’s Graduate Fellowship will provide a 12-month stipend during the first two years of study and a $5,500 summer stipend or stipend supplement (depending on the student's course of study) in the third and fourth years of study. The Dean’s Graduate Fellowship will also cover partial tuition (i.e. tuition remission) and full fees for the fall, spring and summer terms during the first two years of study, and summer tuition and fees during the third and fourth summers for students receiving a summer stipend from this Fellowship. The Graduate School will provide a scholarship for the balance of the tuition.

This award is offered through The Graduate School. Incoming students are nominated by their department; no direct application is necessary.


DGHI Doctoral Scholars

For current Duke doctoral students with a deep interest in global health, the Global Health Doctoral Scholars program offers the opportunity for dynamic intellectual exchange, faculty mentorship and rigorous dissertation research on a global health challenge. In collaboration with a faculty mentor, you will explore the social, economic and cultural context of global health while conducting innovative research impacting health equity and expanding your professional skills and opportunities.


As a Global Health Doctoral Scholar, you will receive 50% of your academic-year stipend for one year and may receive funding for a second year upon successful application for continuation. You will work closely with a DGHI faculty mentor or a mentoring team. Our world-class faculty provide research guidance and professional development opportunities designed to advance your career in global health.

In addition to faculty mentorship and dissertation research, year-round opportunities for engagement include participation in lunch seminars, leading professional development workshops and participating in panel discussions.

One-time grants of up to $12,500 are available for Scholars to undertake dissertation research.

External:

The Office of Campus Research Development has designed toolkits to help graduate students and postdocs prepare proposals to NSF and NIH grant and fellowship programs:

NSF GRFP

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.

Fellows share in the prestige and opportunities that become available when they are selected. Fellows benefit from a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees (paid to the institution), opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct their own research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education they choose.


NIH F31

The purpose of the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31) award is to enable promising predoctoral students to obtain individualized, mentored research training from outstanding faculty sponsors while conducting dissertation research in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers. The proposed mentored research training must reflect the applicant's dissertation research project and is expected to clearly enhance the individual's potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientist.

It is expected that the mentored research training experience will provide:

o   A strong foundation in research design, methods, and analytic techniques appropriate to the proposed dissertation research;

o   The enhancement of the applicant's ability to conceptualize and think through research problems with increasing independence;

o   Experience conducting research using appropriate, state-of-the-art methods, as well as presenting and publishing the research findings as first author;

o   The opportunity to interact with members of the scientific community at appropriate scientific meetings and workshops;

o   Skills needed to transition to the next stage of the applicant's research career; and

o   The opportunity to enhance the applicant's understanding of the health-related sciences and the relationship of the proposed research to health and disease.

Applicants for the F31 must be candidates for the PhD degree and have identified a dissertation research project and sponsor(s).

The Kirschstein-NRSA Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (F31) program may provide up to five years (typically 2-3 years) of support for research training that leads to the PhD or equivalent research degree, the combined MD/PhD degree, or another formally combined professional degree and research doctoral degree in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences. Because this particular F31 program only supports dissertation research training, the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD or Other Dual-Doctoral Degree Fellowship (Parent F30) program will be more appropriate for the training goals of individuals enrolled in dual-degree programs who seek support for both dissertation research training and clinical training.

Stipends

Kirschstein-NRSA awards provide stipends as a subsistence allowance to help defray living expenses during the research and clinical training experiences.  See https://researchtraining.nih.gov/resources/policy-notices.

Tuition and Fees

Fellowship awards will contribute to the combined cost of tuition and fees at the rate in place at the time of award. See https://researchtraining.nih.gov/resources/policy-notices.


NIH F31- Diversity

The purpose of this Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research award is to enhance the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the research training of predoctoral students from diverse backgrounds including those from groups that are underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research workforce.

Through this award program, promising predoctoral students will obtain individualized, mentored research training from outstanding faculty sponsors while conducting well-defined research projects in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers. The proposed mentored research training is expected to clearly enhance the individual's potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientist.

It is expected that the mentored research training experience will provide:

  • A strong foundation in research design, methods, and analytic techniques appropriate to the proposed dissertation research;
  • The enhancement of the applicant's ability to conceptualize and think through research problems with increasing independence;
  • Experience conducting research using appropriate, state-of-the-art methods, as well as presenting and publishing the research findings as first author;
  • The opportunity to interact with members of the scientific community at appropriate scientific meetings and workshops;
  • Skills needed to transition to the next stage of the applicant's research career; and
  • The opportunity to enhance the applicant's understanding of the health-related sciences and the relationship of the proposed research to health and disease.

Although applicants may apply at any time, applications are encouraged once an applicant has identified a specific research project that will be undertaken in the sponsor's laboratory.  This often occurs in the second year of a PhD program. 

The NIH recognizes a unique and compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical, behavioral and clinical sciences research workforce. There are many benefits that flow from a diverse NIH-supported scientific workforce, including: fostering scientific innovation, enhancing global competitiveness, contributing to robust learning environments, improving the quality of the researchers, advancing the likelihood that underserved or health disparity populations participate in, and benefit from health research, and enhancing public trust.

Accordingly, the NIH continues to encourage institutions to diversify their student and faculty populations and to enhance the participation of individuals currently underrepresented in the biomedical, clinical, behavioral, and social sciences.

Stipends

Kirschstein-NRSA awards provide stipends as a subsistence allowance to help defray living expenses during the research and clinical training experiences.  See https://researchtraining.nih.gov/resources/policy-notices.

Tuition and Fees

Fellowship awards will contribute to the combined cost of tuition and fees at the rate in place at the time of award. See https://researchtraining.nih.gov/resources/policy-notices.

 

NSF- Biological Anthropology Program - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants  (BA-DDRIG)

The Biological Anthropology Program supports multifaceted research to advance scientific knowledge of human biology and ecology, including understanding of our evolutionary history and mechanisms that have shaped human and nonhuman primate biological diversity. Supported research focuses on living and fossil forms of both human and nonhuman primates, addressing time scales ranging from the short-term to evolutionary, encompassing multiple levels of analysis (e.g., molecular, organismal, population, ecosystem), conducted in field, laboratory, captive, and computational research environments, and often incorporating interactions between human biology and culture. 

Areas of inquiry that promote understanding of the evolution, biology, and adaptability of our diverse species include, but are not limited to: genetic/epigenetic/genomic variation and relationship to phenotype; ecology and socioecology; functional anatomy and skeletal biology; and paleoanthropology and primate paleontology. Multidisciplinary research that integrates biological anthropology with related anthropological fields, such as archaeology, cultural anthropology, and forensic anthropology, also may receive support through the Program.


NASEM Ford Foundation Fellowship

Through its program of fellowships, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.


POSITIVE FACTORS FOR SELECTION

•        Evidence of superior academic achievement

•        Degree of promise of continuing achievement as scholars and teachers

•        Capacity to respond in pedagogically productive ways to the learning needs of students from diverse backgrounds

•        Sustained personal engagement with communities that are underrepresented in the academy and an ability to bring this asset to learning, teaching, and scholarship at the college and university level

  • Likelihood of using the diversity of human experience as an educational resource in teaching and scholarship
  • Membership in one or more of the following groups whose underrepresentation in the American professoriate has been severe and longstanding:

o Alaska Natives (Aleut, Eskimo, or other Indigenous People of Alaska)

o Black/African Americans

o Mexican Americans/Chicanas/Chicanos

o Native American Indians

o Native Pacific Islanders (Hawaiian/Polynesian/ Micronesian)

o Puerto Ricans


STIPEND AND BENEFITS

• An annual stipend of $27,000 for three years

• An invitation to attend the Conference of Ford Fellows

• Access to Ford Fellow Regional Liaisons – a network of former Ford Fellows who have volunteered to provide mentoring and support to current Fellows – and access to other networking resources


The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

The purpose of the Fellowship is to provide opportunities for continuing generations of able and accomplished New Americans to achieve leadership in their chosen fields and to partake of the American dream. The program was established in recognition of the contributions New Americans have made to American life and in gratitude for the opportunities the United States afforded the founders of the Fellowship, Paul & Daisy Soros.

Award:

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program honors the contributions of immigrants and children of immigrants to the United States. Each year, we invest in the graduate education of 30 New Americans—immigrants and children of immigrants—who are poised to make significant contributions to US society, culture or their academic field. Each Fellow receives up to $90,000 in financial support over two years, and they join a lifelong community of New American Fellows.


1. NEW AMERICAN STATUS

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program is intended for immigrants and children of immigrants in the United States. 

To be eligible, your birth parents must have both been born outside of the US as non-US citizens, and both parents must not have been eligible for US citizenship at the time of their births.* In addition, one of the following must be true of you as of the October 29 application deadline:

  • Born in the US: You are a US citizen by birth and both of your parents were born abroad as non-US citizens.
  • Born abroad:
    • Naturalized Citizen: You have been naturalized as a US citizen either on your own or as a minor child under the application of one of your parents.
    • Adopted: You were born outside of the US or one of its territories and were subsequently adopted by American parents and were awarded US citizenship because of your adoption.
    • Green Card: You are in possession of a valid green card.
    • Refugee & Asylees: You have been granted asylum or refugee status in the US.
    • If None of the Other Categories Above Apply: Graduated from High School and College in the US: If none of the other categories apply to you and you were born abroad but graduated from both high school and college in the US (this includes current and past DACA recipients).


* If you were raised by only one of your birth parents, the following must be true:

  • The parent who raised you must have been born abroad as a non-US citizen.

  • Your second birth parent was not part of your life growing up and you have no contact with them.


2. ACADEMIC STANDING

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program is intended for immigrants and children of immigrants who are pursuing full-time graduate degrees at United States institutions. To be eligible, you will have a bachelor’s degree as of the fall of 2021. You may be applying to graduate school at the same time that you are applying to the Fellowship, or you may already be enrolled in the graduate program that you are seeking fundig for as of the application deadline. The Fellowship is open to all fields of study and fully accredited full-time graduate degree programs. To be eligible for the Fellowship, you should be planning to be enrolled full-time in an eligible graduate degree program at a US university for the full 2021-22 academic year. To be eligible, you must not have begun the third year of the program that you are seeking funding for as of the October 29, 2020 deadline. If you have a previous graduate degree or are in a joint-degree program, you may still be eligible. 

3. AGE

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program is intended for students who are early in their careers. All students must be 30 or younger as of the application deadline. To be eligible for the Fellowship, you must not have reached or passed your 31st birthday as of the application deadline. There is no minimum age requirement.


The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program uses three primary criteria for selection of Fellows:

  • The candidate has demonstrated creativity, originality and initiative in one or more aspects of her/his life.
  • The candidate has demonstrated a commitment to and capacity for accomplishment that has required drive and sustained effort.
  • The candidate has demonstrated a commitment to the values expressed in the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. This would include, but not be limited to, support of human rights and the rule of law, opposition to unwarranted encroachment on personal liberty, and advancing the responsibilities of citizenship in a free society.

In addition, the program considers two further criteria:

  • The candidate gives promise of continued significant contributions. Those contributions are likely to reflect distinctive creativity, originality and initiative and will mark the candidate as a leading and influential figure within her/his fields of endeavor.
  • The candidate's graduate training is relevant to her/his long-term career goals and is of potential value in enhancing her/his future creativity and accomplishment.
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